Coloring Page – Mammoth

The mammoth is certainly one of my favorite figurines produced by the LEGO® Group. I love LEGO® animals, and science related sets. This one is from 60195, the Arctic Mobile Exploration Base. I reviewed it this past week (click here to read). You can click on the link below to download a printable copy of this coloring page (it will open in a new window). If you like the content at True North Bricks, I would love it if you followed me here on WordPress (click the “follow” option in the menu to your right), FacebookPinterest, or Twitter for weekly coloring pages. Happy coloring!

Click here to download the mammoth coloring page.

The coloring pages at True North Bricks are provided free of charge for printing and coloring. Feel free to share these images on social media (with the appropriate link back to True North Bricks), but please do not re-post them on other websites without my permission.

Want your own LEGO® Mammoth?

Using the affiliate links below to buy the Arctic Mobile Exploration Base will earn me a little commission at no extra cost to you. This helps to manage some of the costs associated with running this blog, and keeps all content at True North Bricks free. Thanks for your support!

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Top 10 Biggest Classic LEGO® Castles

Growing up, the Castles theme was one of my favorites. The first set that I remember getting was the Black Falcons’ Fortress (6074). Among my favorite sets growing up were Majisto’s Magical Workshop (6048), and the Night Lord’s Castle (6097). While none of those make today’s list, I thought it would be fun to take a look at the 10 biggest LEGO®  classic Castle sets ever produced. For the purposes of this list, I am only looking at the original LEGO® themes like Castles, Knights Kingdom, and Kingdoms. I will not be looking at licensed themes like Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings.

Most of the images in this article were pulled from perusing old instruction manuals on the lego.com website. However, not all sets were available via that route. For set 375 and 6090, the images came from random eBay auctions.

10. Royal Knights’ Castle

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Royal Knights Castle (6090) instruction manual cover. ©LEGO Group. This is an independent site not authorized or sponsored by the LEGO Group.

Set #: 6090
Brick Count: 764
Minifigures: 11
Year: 1995
Fun Facts: This castle featured an exclusive raised baseplate not seen in any other set.

09. Castle

375

Castle (375) instruction manual cover. ©LEGO Group. This is an independent site not authorized or sponsored by the LEGO Group.

Set #: 375
Brick Count: 767
Minifigures: 14
Year: 1978
Of Interest: This was the first LEGO® castle ever produced. It came with yellow bricks because, at the time, the LEGO® Group thought that providing grey bricks would promote children building guns.

08. Trolls’ Mountain Fortress

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Trolls’ Mountain Fortress (7097) instruction manual cover. ©LEGO Group. This is an independent site not authorized or sponsored by the LEGO Group.

Set #: 7097
Brick Count: 844
Minifigures: 10
Year: 2009
Of Interest: This is the only LEGO® castle produced that was not manned by some faction of Minifigure knights. Instead, it was run by trolls!

07. Royal King’s Castle

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Royal King’s Castle (10176) instruction manual cover. ©LEGO Group. This is an independent site not authorized or sponsored by the LEGO Group.

Set #: 10176
Brick Count: 869
Minifigures: 12
Year: 2006
Fun Facts: This castle features a basement blacksmith’s shop and torture chamber! Oddly, none of the Minifigures feature any body printing.

06. King’s Castle

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King’s Castle (7946) instruction manual cover. ©LEGO Group. This is an independent site not authorized or sponsored by the LEGO Group.

Set #: 7946
Brick Count: 933
Minifigures: 8
Year: 2010
Fun Facts: This was a modular castle in which you could easily rearrange the walls and towers into different layouts.

05. Vladek’s Dark Fortress

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Vladek’s Dark Fortress (8877) instruction manual cover. ©LEGO Group. This is an independent site not authorized or sponsored by the LEGO Group.

Set #: 8877
Brick Count: 967
Minifigures: 9
Year: 2005
Fun Facts: Unlike many other castle sets produced, this one was home to villain!

04. King’s Castle Siege

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King’s Castle Siege (7094) instruction manual cover. ©LEGO Group. This is an independent site not authorized or sponsored by the LEGO Group.

Set #: 7094
Brick Count: 973
Minifigures: 10
Year: 2007
Fun Facts: The basic layout for this set was influenced by the original LEGO® castle produced in 1978 (set #375). The castle’s crest even bears similarities!

03. King’s Castle

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King’s Castle (70404) instruction manual cover. ©LEGO Group. This is an independent site not authorized or sponsored by the LEGO Group.

Set #: 70404
Brick Count: 996
Minifigures: 7
Year: 2013
Of Interest: While not the biggest set in the castle-themed sets, this is actually the largest castle ever produced for a classic knights related theme. It can also be joined to The Gatehouse Raid (70402) to make it even bigger.

02. Kingdoms Joust

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Kingdoms Joust (10223) instruction manual cover. ©LEGO Group. This is an independent site not authorized or sponsored by the LEGO Group.

Set #: 10223
Brick Count: 2012
Minifigures: 9
Year: 2012
Fun Facts: This set was designed so that if you bought two, they would fit together perfectly back to back.

01. Medieval Market Village

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Medieval Market Village (10193) instruction manual cover. ©LEGO Group. This is an independent site not authorized or sponsored by the LEGO Group.

Set #: 10193
Brick Count: 1601
Minifigures: 8
Year: 2009
Fun Facts: In addition to being the largest classic castle set ever produced, the Medieval Market Village also included the first roasted turkey and cow.

Have any fond memories to share of any of these sets? Feel free to comment in space below. Also, if you like the content at True North Bricks, I would love it if you followed me here on WordPress (click the “follow” option in the menu to your right), FacebookPinterest, or Twitter for regular updates.

Until next time,

-Tom

Canadian LEGO® Deals (Feb. 7, 2019)

This weekend only, all LEGO® Movie 2 sets earn double VIP points at the LEGO® Store, and there is a Rex Dangervest Minifigure freebie with purchases over $40 (until Feb. 17). Mastermind Toys, Hudson’s Bay, and Toys R Us have all updated their sales too. Walmart has no significant savings online for the third week in a row.

AFFILIATE LINKS

These affiliate links earn a small commission that helps keep the content at True North Bricks free.

Click here to view LEGO® deals at Amazon.ca

Click here to view freebies and promotions at the LEGO® Store

Click here to view deals at the LEGO® Store

ALL NON-AFFILIATE LEGO® DEALS

CHAPTERS & INDIGO BOOKSTORES
The following deals are being advertised online. The sales may not be available in all stores.

  • DC Super Heroes: Flying Fox for $96.00 (39% off)
  • Friends: all travel friendly play sets are 25% off
  • Juniors: Friends – Stephanie’s Lakeside House for $27.00 (39% off)
  • Nexo Knights: Tech Wizard Showdown for $44.00 (19% off, online only)
  • Nexo Knights: Aaron’s X-bow for $42.00 (39% off)
  • Star Wars: Rathtar Escape for $60.00 (40% off)
  • Star Wars: Han Solo’s Landspeeder for $22.50 (35% off)
  • Star Wars: BB-8 for $84.50 (34% off)

COSTCO
The prices are compared to the regular price at the LEGO® Store. You do not need a membership to access these deals online.

  • City: Mountain Police Headquarters for $84.99 (23% off)
  • City: Passenger Train for $148.99 (26% off)
  • City: Downtown Fire Brigade for $111.09 (20% off)
  • Classic: Large Creative Brick Box for $49.99 (17% off)
  • Creator: Cruising Adventures for $62.99 (21% off)
  • Creator: Volkswagen T1 Camper for $99.99 (13% off)
  • Friends: Snow Resort Ice Rink for $34.99 (13% off)
  • Friends: Mia’s Treehouse for $29.99 (25% off)
  • Friends: Friendship House for $63.99 (29% off)
  • Friends: Heartlake City Resort for $102.99 (20% off)
  • Harry Potter Minifigures box of 60 for $189.99 (20% off)
  • Harry Potter: Hogwarts Great Hall for $119.99 (8% off)
  • Harry Potter: Whomping Willow for $84.99 (6% off)
  • Ideas: Saturn V Rocket for $118.99 (21% off)
  • Ideas: Ship in a Bottle for $79.99 (11% off)
  • Jurassic World: Carnotaurus Gyrosphere Escape for $78.99 (21% off)
  • Jurassic World: Indoraptor Rampage at Lockwood Estate for $129.99 (13% off)
  • LEGO® Movie 2: Pop Up Party Bus for $90.09 (10% off)
  • LEGO® Movie 2: Emmet’s Dream House for $79.99 (12% off)
  • Minecraft: The Bedrock Adventures for $89.99 (10% off)
  • Ninjago Movie: Ninjago City for $279.99 (20% off)
  • Ninjago: The Dragon Pit for $139.99 (13% off)
  • Ninjago: Monastery of Spinjitzu for $89.99 (10% off)
  • Speed Champions: Ferrari Ultimate Garage for $119.99 (8% off)
  • Star Wars: First Order Heavy Assault Walker for $123.99 (27% off)
  • Star Wars: Kessel Run Millennium Falcon for $154.99 (23% off)
  • Star Wars: Sandcrawler for $115.99 (27% off)
  • Technic: Rally Car for $109.99 (21% off)
  • Technic: Forest Machine for $128.99 (28% off)
  • Technic: Mack Anthem Truck for $189.99 (17% off)

HUDSON’S BAY
All LEGO® appears to be about 15% off.

MASTERMIND TOYS

  • 20% off on all Friends sets
  • 20% off on all Duplo sets
  • 20% off on LEGO® Movie 2 books
  • Spending $25 or more on LEGO® before Feb. 17 will get you a $10 LEGO® gift card valid in-store only from March 1 – 17.

TOYS R US
Make-and-Take a mini version of Emmet’s Dream House from the LEGO® Movie 2 at Toys R Us on Saturday, Feb. 9, from 11am to 1pm. Additionally:

  • 20% off on all LEGO® sets usually priced at $39.99 (so, they now cost $31.97)
  • 15% off on Jurassic World sets
  • 15% off on Harry Potter sets

 

Review – Arctic Mobile Exploration Base [60195]

In 2018, we saw a return to the arctic in the City theme. The last time LEGO® took us to the arctic was back in 2014. I only bought one of those sets, but I really loved it. So, I was happy to see the sub-theme revived. I also love the LEGO® science/exploration based sets. The 2014 sets focused on geology, and the discovery of crystals in the North. This time around, we are still looking at exploration, but instead of crystals, our intrepid Minifigures are going in search of the frozen remains of animals long extinct. I am even more psyched about that because zoology, paleontology, and phylogeography are all things that fascinate me. This sort of body-fossil hunting also actually happens in this day and age with the melting permafrost (though LEGO® has made it seem much more glamorous that it really is, I think). Let’s see if the Arctic Mobile Exploration Base (hereafter AMEB… I’m not writing that out once very paragraph) lives up to my expectations.

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LEGO Arctic Mobile Exploration Base box art.

SET SUMMARY

NAME: Arctic Mobile Exploration Base
SET #: 60195
THEME: City
COST: $149.99 CAD
BRICK COUNT: 786
MINIFIGURES: 6
OF INTEREST: Mammoth & Snow-bike
RELEASE DATE: June 2, 2018

DSC_0220Web

All the builds in the AMEB can be joined into one long caravan.

SUMMARY REVIEW: 75%

VALUE: 60% (This will set you back $0.19/brick.)
BUILD: 90% (nicely designed except for a few nit-picky details.)
MINIFIGURES: 88% (Nice figs, good accessories, awesome mammoth.)
ENTERTAINMENT: 
60% (Really bad build-time value, but super fun set.)

DSC_0228Web

The Arctic Mobile Exploration Base comes with tools for breaking up ice.

REVIEW

VALUE: 60%
With 786 bricks and a price tag of $149.99 in Canada, you are looking at a cost per brick of $0.19. That is crazy expensive considering that my current average based on two years of sets is $0.14. High cost per brick is to be expected with City sets though. Even averages based even on the catalogs are high. I rate the AMEB set at 3/5 (60%) for value.

DSC_0218web

The Arctic Mobile Exploration Base comes complete with a snow bike,

BUILD: 90%
There are five individual builds that make up the AMEB set. The simplest is probably the chunk of ice that houses the mammoth body-fossil. The build does not completely cover the mammoth, so I guess they found this one jutting out of some melted permafrost. The build is a little flimsy, but it is meant to be. It has to come apart easily so that Minifigs can remove their frozen prize. If I had to pick one of the builds to be less impressed with, it would be this one. However, it is a necessary part of the set, and I think it has a lot of play value (which I will discuss more later).

DSC_0235web

That is one remarkably well preserved mammoth.

The rest of the AMEB is all meant to be a series of interconnected vehicles. The smallest is a cargo sled that tacks onto the end of the caravan. Despite its simplicity, I really like that this build was included in the set. Of course a mobile arctic expedition is going to need extra supplies, and a sled to carry them. It is that touch of authenticity that I really like to see in my LEGO® sets. My only complaint about this build is that one set of skis has to be attached backwards (the design does allow for all skis to face the same way). The up-turned ends on both sets of skis should face the same direction, otherwise one set will always be snagging in real life… but perhaps I am trying to be too realistic. There are two crates to go on board that you can fill with accessories. Or just put the whole mammoth on once it has been excavated.

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The Arctic Mobile Exploration Base cargo sled.

To help in breaking up the ice around the mammoth, you also have a mobile saw vehicle. In reality, this thing seems to lack the finesse that I would imagine that you need when extracting fossils… but, then again, I have never actually seen a mammoth carcass being excavated, so what do I know? The vehicle is fun all the same. The saw is attached to an arm that has two points of articulation in addition to an axle for the saw the spin on. Sadly, the vehicle falls prey to one of my LEGO® pet peeves… no doors into the cab. The roof lifts off to allow you to stick a Minifigure inside.

DSC_0232Web

The Arctic Mobile Exploration Base saw vehicle.

The “base” part of the set’s title comes to life with a little lab built on skis. The exterior is really nice looking, and has some interesting angles. The use of two levels of windows also gives it the appearance of being larger than it actually is. Sadly, the skis are set up similarly to the sled, meaning the front and back skis face in opposite directions. A door gives Minifigures access to the interior where you have a little lab bench. There is a bone on the examination table, and a mounted camera for documenting it. There is a wall mounted screen in the room as well, and the staple coffee maker. One thing I particularly like about this build is the bunk-style bed. You can access the space for play purposes through a hatch built into the roof.

DSC_0231web

The Arctic Mobile Exploration Base lab.

The largest build in the AMEB set is the crane vehicle. It is pretty heavy duty, and meant to pull the whole caravan along. There is a really neat little worm and gear system at the base of the crane arm that allows you to raise and lower and arm, subsequently lifting or lowering anything attached to the crane’s hook. The interior of the cab also has a nice design, and is big enough for two Minifigures. Each has sitting space, one to drive, and the other to operate the crane (for which they included a console and levers). On the exterior, there are ladders built in on either side of the vehicle for Minifigures to climb in… but no doors. The doors are stickers meant to depict hatches, which are actually too small for a Minifigure anyway…

My list of complaints with the AMEB are few. It is a nicely designed set, and the end product looks nice. While I can’t imagine many real arctic research teams being able to afford equipment like this, it is pretty cool that science is so well funded in the fictional LEGO® universe. If I rated each of these builds as a little set, each one would lose one mark for a little detail or another (flimsy design, backwards skis, no doors). But, overall, I will still give the AMEB a conglomerate score of 9/10 (90%).

DSC_0229web

The Arctic Mobile Exploration Base crane vehicle.

MINIFIGURES: 88%
You get six Minifigures in the AMEB. Each of them comes with a head covering of some kind, but no hair pieces. None of them have double sided faces, and only one has any leg printing. But, all have front and back printed torsos. You also get one new piece in the form of a blue fur-lined hat with the flaps down. That is one of my favorite little things about this set. Based on my rating system, these Minifigures on their own would earn a score of 61/90 (68%). But, you get a load of accessories too. There are two ice picks, two mugs, two circular hand saws, one jack hammer, a radio, a bone, a camera, and a couple of pairs of snowshoes. You also get the two crates, the snow-bike, and, of course, the mammoth. All of that brings the score up to 77/90 (86%).

With six Minifigures and 786 pieces, you are looking at a brick-to-Minifigure ratio of 131-to-1. Already, that is really good. However, you also get the mammoth. Seriously, how many of you wanted this set just for the mammoth? I did. If we add the mammoth into the calculation, the ratio changes to 112:1, which earns a score of 90%. Averaging this ratio score with the Minifigure design score gives an overall Minifigure grade of 88%.

ENTERTAINMENT: 60%
The AMEB took me two hours and thirteen minutes to build (133 minutes). At $149.99, that means that each minute of build time costs $1.13. My average cost per minute is currently $0.85 per minute, so this set is not a great value in terms of the amount of build time that you will get out of it. Sadly, it only gets 1/5 (20%) in that department.

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The awesome mammoth figurine.

In terms of enjoyment, I really like this set. As I mentioned earlier, I really like the science based sets. I particularly like the idea of searching for body-fossils that LEGO® has used this time around. I have already had a lot of photography time with this set, and I am anticipating more. I have have loads of fun ideas for pictures with this theme, and maybe some other creative projects that will make their way here to True North Bricks… I also see this set as being a lot of fun for play. I know I would have loved it growing up. Finding the mammoth, and playing through its excavation would have been a thrill for a younger me. The “base” idea was always important in my play when I was little. My characters always had to have a base of some sort. I probably won’t keep this set built forever due to space constraints, but I will keep it around for a while. I also think this is the type of set that will inspire future generations of scientists. It may not be super realistic, but it will open up the minds of kids to future possibilities through imagination and play. I will give it 5/5 (100%) for enjoyment. Averaging that with the build-time score gives and overall entertainment rating of 60%.

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An interior view of the crane vehicle’s cab.

OVERALL: 75%

In general, you are getting a really nice set in the AMEB. I love the story behind the set, and I love the look of the set. I think this set will inspire young minds to delve deeper into science after playing through some adventures. Getting a mammoth figure is also amazing. Where the AMEB falls flat is value. You are paying A LOT for this kit at $149.99, and you don’t get a lot of bricks for that price, or a lot of initial build time. While I do recommend this set, I also recommend waiting for a sale. I think the price point for the AMEB should be about 20% less ($120). At that price, your cost per brick goes down to $0.15, and the build-time ends up being $0.90/minute. In the end, that changes the overall score to 80%. So, the AMEB is certainly worth picking up, but wait for a sale of 20% or more.

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Mountain/glacier climbing Minifigure included in the Arctic Mobile Exploration Base set.

What are your feelings on the Arctic Mobile Exploration Base set? Feel free to leave a comment in the field below. Also, if you like the content at True North Bricks, I would love it if you followed me here on WordPress (click the “follow” option in the menu to your right), FacebookPinterest, or Twitter for regular updates.

Until next time,

-Tom

Want to buy this set?

Using the affiliate links below to buy the Arctic Mobile Exploration Base will earn me a little commission at no extra cost to you. This helps to manage some of the costs associated with running this blog, and keeps all content at True North Bricks free. Thanks for your support!

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Minifigure Monday – Dream there was a window here…

Dream there was a window here…
(An original LEGO® inspired poem from True North Bricks)

Take a step outside your door, and walk down the street.
Contemplate what came before, underneath your feet.
Dream there was a window here, through your paradigm,
And today could disappear, for a look through time.
Flipping through the centuries, as you’d read a book.
All the planet’s memories, just for you to look.
What stood in this very spot, but ages ago?
Would you look, or would you not, would you want to know?

MammothLensBallWeb

This poem was inspired by the LEGO® Woolly Mammoth from the Arctic Mobile Exploration Base set.

Want your own LEGO® Mammoth?

True North Bricks is an affiliate of LEGO® Brand Retail. Using the link below earns a small commission for me, at no extra cost to you. That helps to keep content at True North Bricks free! Thank you for your support.

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Coloring Page: Lucy

With the LEGO® Movie 2 hitting theaters, I thought I would commemorate the event with a coloring page. This week, I present Battle Ready Lucy from the latest Minifigure series! You can use the link below to download a printable PDF of this page (it will open in a new window). If you like the content at True North Bricks, I would love it if you followed me here on WordPress (click the “follow” option in the menu to your right), FacebookPinterest, or Twitter for weekly coloring pages. Happy coloring!

Click here to download a copy of the Battle Ready Lucy coloring page.

The coloring pages at True North Bricks are provided free of charge for printing and coloring. Feel free to share these images on social media (with the appropriate link back to True North Bricks), but please do not re-post them on other websites without my permission.

Want to buy this Minifigure?

Battle Ready Lucy is part of the LEGO® Movie 2 Minifigure series. True North Bricks is a LEGO® Brand Retail affiliate site. Using the link below earns a small commission for me, at no extra cost to you. That helps to keep content, like these coloring pages, free!

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A Guide to Turning LEGO® Keychains into Minifigures

A few years ago, the LEGO® Group released set 76013, also known as The Joker Steam Roller. It contained the first Batgirl Minifigure. I didn’t buy the set. I wanted Batgirl and Joker from that set, but the rest of the kit didn’t appeal to me. I let the set go into retirement. While we have gotten many nice Batgirl and Joker Minifigs since then, I have always felt like I missed out a little. I was intrigued to see that LEGO® released a keychain version of the Batgirl Minifigure. The keychains are, after all, just Minifigures attached to a chain and ring. But, the question remained, how easily could you get rid of the chain and ring?

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The first keychain I attempted to turn into a Minifigure… my worn out Superman.

I decided to test the separation process out. But, I didn’t want to ruin a brand new keychain in case it didn’t work. Luckily, I had a worn out Superman keychain from a few years ago that was reaching the end of its life. So, I tried it out, and it worked. I even found a double-sided face that I never even knew my Superman keychain had. I don’t  believe for a minute that I am the first person to try this, but what follows is my little guide to turning a LEGO® keychain into a Minifigure.

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Separated from his chain, Superman seems like a new Minifigure!

With Superman a success under my belt, I decided to try again with Batgirl. Here’s how I did it:

Step 1: select your keychain

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The subject of my keychain-to-Minifigure experiment.

Step 02: locate ring connecting chain to Minifig

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A ring connects the chain to the pin in the Minifigure’s head.

Step 03: pry open the ring with needle nose pliers

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There is an opening in the loop, and a little twist with pliers will have it coming right off.

You can repeat step 03 to also separate the printed LEGO® tile from the chain, and get an extra brick.

Step 04: remove the pin (with some force)

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You’ll need to use some force to pull, and probably twist a little the same time.

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The pin is quite long, don’t be afraid to use a bit of muscle to yank it out.

Step 05: enjoy your new Minifigure

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With the pin out, you have a regular Minifigure, more or less.

So, what are the pros and cons of turning LEGO® keychains into Minifigures? We’ll start with the cons, because I generally like to get the bad news out of the way first. First off, the legs are glued to the torso, so pulling the pin out doesn’t solve that issue. Secondly, the hairpiece, head, and neck all have holes in them from where the pin was. Finally, any accessories the original character may have come with are not included. Those are all minor issues in my books, but I can understand how they might bother some.

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Batgirl, free of her chains.

Now for the pros. First, you get access to the hidden double-sided face. Second, even though the legs are not removable, the head, hair, cape, and hands all are. Third, keychains are way cheaper than actual sets. The Joker Steam Roller retailed for $59.99 in Canada, which is a lot to pay for a set that I didn’t want just to get the Minifigure. A keychain costs $5.99 at the LEGO® Store. I admit that $5.99 is more than you would pay for a Minifigure from the blind-bag series, but here you know which one you are getting. Also, keychains often go on sale. This Batgirl cost me $2.99, which is less than a blind-bag. Finally, you are getting real LEGO® parts, which beats buying the cheap fLEGO (fake LEGO) stuff on the internet, or paying re-sale prices.

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Batgirl’s alternate face, which you can’t access in keychain form.

All in all, I was quite happy with my new Batgirl Minifigure. It doesn’t bother me that the legs don’t come off, because I wanted this particular Minifig, and wouldn’t be trading parts anyway. The holes left behind by the pin are also not a major issue for me. The only one that I wish I could get rid of is the one on her cowl, as it would hide all the other ones. I am sure some epoxy or something could solve that issue. Will I be trying this again? For sure. I hope this little tutorial was helpful. If you have tried this before, or have something to add, feel free to comment below.

Until next time,

-Tom

p.s. If you like the content at True North Bricks, I would love it if you followed me here on WordPress (click the “follow” option in the menu to your right), FacebookPinterest, or Twitter for regular updates.

BatgirlWeb

And just like that, a new Minifigure prowls the rooftops of LEGO® city.

Want to buy this keychain?

True North Bricks is an affiliate site of LEGO® Brand Retail. Using the link below to buy the Batgirl keychain will earn me a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps to manage some of the costs associated with running this blog, and keeps the content provided free. Thanks for your support!

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